EVENT RECAP & GIVEAWAY - Leigh Bardugo & Robin LeFevers



Yesterday Viv and I drove down to the Redondo Beach Mysterious Galaxy. Even though this location is closer to us than the San Deigo one, this was actually the first time for us at Redondo Beach. We loved this location. It was roomier, well organized, with great staff and a wonderful cafe. Hopefully we'll have other opportunities to visit this bookstore.





When we got there we met up with Stacee and her friend Miohelle. There was already a group of about 10 girls there about an hour and a half before the signing, which meant that the signing was going to be a pretty big one. Thanks to Stacee's quick moves we were able to get front row seating (Again).

The authors got there at 07:40 and answered about an hours worth of Q&A. Some which they asked each other and then opened up to the audience. So, at this point I have been able to go many signings with AMAZING authors, but guys I have to admit that Leigh Bardugo and Robin LaFevers  really stood out to me. They were super nice, quirky and funny and were extremely enjoyable to listen to.





























As always Stacee with her super quick fingers, has a good recap of some of the Q&A up on her site so make sure to check it out there!

Giveaway Details
1  winner will receive a signed paperback of Shadow and Bone 
 1 winner will receive a signed hardback of Siege and Storm
1 winner will receive a signed paperback of Grave Mercy

Giveaway is open internationally!

Please answer the following comment question:
Robin and Leigh discussed the issue of Beauty and YA. How do you feel about idea of all the heroines
and hero always being described as being beautiful?




a Rafflecopter giveaway

69 comments :

  1. Well... the Heroin and Hero from Uglies were often described as ugly by them-self/the main character. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so in essence, everyone can be considered beautiful. I suppose actually, it's stupid to actually come out and say the character is beautiful. When people read the book, they are going to interpret the characters description in a pleasing way, even if you say the character has a hump, a crooked nose, and a snaggle tooth.

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  2. I think personality can make a character more attractive. For that reason for movies like the Hunger Games, I made Peeta much more attractive in my mind than the actor in the film. Heroes and heroines have those qualities that make them special and beautiful in their own ways.

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  3. I don't really see it as a problem. Everyone is beautiful in their own way. It's nice when they don't have perfect looks, and it gets annoying when every character is in love with the main character due to their beauty, but I've no problem with attractive characters.

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  4. I don't really mind having a "beautiful" hero/heroine in a book, but even if the character isnt physically beautiful, they can still be beautiful due to their personality.

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  5. Ok, the question may appear to be simple, but in reality it has a deeper meaning than it seems. Personally, I have mixed feelings about this issue. Firstly, one can complain that it's an objectification of people (making them beautiful, perfect, powerful etc.), it gives other people a certain feeling of inferiority, and I can fully agree with this statement. But on the other hand, we are reading books because we want to forget about reality and sink into the perfect world of adventures, magic. Everyone wants to be perfect, beautiful. Reading about the adventures of beautiful heroes/heroines help us to forget about our own imperfections. That is just my opinion ^^

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  6. I've noticed many of the heroines in books are 'beautiful' but many times I just imagine them as normal people. I don't agree that the heroine should always be beautiful.

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  7. Breanna Lee BrownJune 22, 2013 at 6:26 PM

    Just because a character fits society's definition of "beautiful" does not mean she's a heroine. She could use that beauty to entice and destroy other people, and that would turn her into a villain. A heroine, in comparison, is dedicated to defending what she believes in. She should be humble, willing to learn from her mistakes. That's what I think true beauty is. She doesn't have to look like a model to make a difference.

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  8. I don't like that they're always beautiful. But then again, it doesn't really matter to me. They don't have to be beautiful in terms of appearances, they could be beautiful in many other ways, which is more preferable than the first.

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  9. I have noticed this and it does kind of get on my nerves. I like when the author describes how the characters looks, and then me as a reader I can come up with a picture in my head (which, as someone already mentioned, is always flattering!)

    I think bc it is mentioned SO often that they are beautiful, I kind of loses its meaning...like, oh...of course.,,gorgeous like a model,,heroine

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  10. They do always seem to go hand in hand. But I think it depends on the reader, and who they see in their minds as they read. I just don't like it when their outer appearances are mentioned more than their personality and inner character traits. Or when the main character always seems to mention how "handsome" or "beautiful" their counterpart is, rather than what they love about that person's personality or heart.

    Great question! :)

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  11. I don't really mind that most of the heroines/heroes are described as "beautiful", as long as the author doesn't constantly remind us how beautiful they are. I do not think there is anything wrong with creating a character which you imagine or find to be attractive, and sometimes it isn't the characters looks but the characters personality that makes them so "beautiful". Overall I prefer to have the character described by their physical characteristics.

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  12. Well to tell the truth I love Hero/heroines who aren't "beautiful" but I am good with the fact most writes seem to want their characters to be that way. Maybe its a society thing, I personally liked flawed characters, they seem to be more real to me.

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  13. I don't really mind if heroine/ hero is considered beautiful, but I think that many people tend to prefer the "perfect" main character. I think a reason is because when we read novels, we tend to visualize ourselves as the narrator, or the main character, and it really effects the way a person feels about a novel. Some people read to escape reality, into a perfect world...

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  14. I don't mind a "beautiful" hero or heroine, but I also want them to have a personality. I like characters that have hang ups, because they seem more real to me. I don't like perfect characters where there is nothing wrong with them. I think the quirks/insecurities make them endearing.

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  15. I find it boring that the hero/heroine is always beautiful. I think is bad for younger readers who may feel they don't add up. I tend to prefer flawed characters myself. But it doesn't prevent me from reading and enjoying a book it's just a minor irritant.

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  16. I agree with others in that I don't mind them being beautiful, but I also like to see the occasional flawed or scarred hero/heroine, too. I like the added character such flaws/scars give to the protagonist/s and find that the reading experience is slightly richer for me when the hero/heroine isn't perfect.

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  17. I feel like physical appearance isn't even something that should be brought up unless it has something to do with the story (self-image, ethnic or racial identity, etc). I don't mind when characters are described as beautiful, especially if they are some form of otherworldly creature, but I get annoyed when characters fall in love with each other because they are beautiful/handsome. As others have said, it's the characters' quirks and strengths that make me root for them, not their beauty.

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  18. .I don't mind when the hero or heroine is described as good looking but if that is all the book is about, that is when I find myself to be slightly irritated. Everyone is beautiful in their own special and unique way and I think that is what we should mostly be focused on instead of wondering what the main hero looks like.

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  19. It's almost a common thing to be beautiful in books, and when you come across a character that is described as 'not beautiful' compared to others or the protagonist, it makes it more relatable and real, because not everyone is a pre-set/categorized 'beauty' that everyone expects. Beauty isn't what makes a book character or book - its the characters personality and story line/plot.

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  20. As Kelly said above " Beauty is in the eye of the beholder". To me it doesn't matter whether the hero or heroine is good looking or not. The art of telling a story is what matters the most to me. Like in "The Duff" the heroine doesn't think herself as good looking or in the book "Keeping the Moon" where the heroine shies away from the mirror because of what she looked like in the past. Beauty isn't the issue as far as I'm concerned!

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  21. Firstly, i would like to thank you for such an exciting blog post and a really amazing giveaway!! In response to your facinating question, i would have to say that in Young Adult literature beauty is common - yes. But, beauty can also be expressed through the great deeds and compassionate actions of the main protagonists (hero/ heroine), who are "role models" to the age-group of reader. The saying that beauty comes from within, is never more true when observing main characters of a story who are not flawless beings: but who choose to act in a way that is beautiful to behold and 'right'.

    Thank you x

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  22. I wish there were more plain characters in writing that are simply beautiful to their significant other. I am starting to get tired of everyone in a story finding the main protagonist desirable and gorgeous.

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  23. I don't mind when the main characters are beautiful; I mind much more when the guy's only fault is his "crooked smile". That's not even natural!

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  24. I'd love to have a normal looking main character. Eleanor and Eleanor and Park was normal-looking, and it's cool to read about someone who isn't perfect and beautiful. It's awesome when they're beautiful to the people who love them, not to everyone:)

    Thank you:)

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  25. I don't mind if the characters are perceived as beautiful. Mostly I think it's all perception anyways. I take it in the way that the heroine is beautiful to the hero and vice versa because they are in love or in lust. Not necessarily that they are both runway models. I know some books are literal and their beauty is the focus, but I don't think that's how it's intended in general.

    Tamara @ Shelf Addiction
    Check out Shelf Addiction's current giveaway!

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  26. I really don't mind when the main characters are beautiful since I can easily imagine them but I also don't mind book with normal looking characters on it. Either way, it's fine by me as to how the author wants to portray the looks of his/her characters.

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  27. It depends on how they are described as beautiful. If they are physically beautiful, then it doesn't bother me too much but I think it would be better if they were describes more as beautiful inside :)

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  28. I believe that beauty is inside us and not on the outside, but to be realistic on how most of the world thinks, if there was an ugly heroin then the book is not as appealing, especially if you were to put a hideous looking woman on the cover, it would surely not sell much at all. That is just how the world sadly works and looks at things these days and there really is no way around it.

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  29. The hero/heroine needs to be likeable in some way. Whether it is their amazing personality or their looks, beauty in some form makes them likeable.

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  30. I think they should be a little more normal because a lot of the time they're normal people and it's unusual that they're so beautiful, but it also helps with the story for example helping someone fall in love with them, making the character likeable, etc. But at the same time I don't think it's exactly helping young people feel great about themselves, because beautiful heroes/heroines show that only beautiful people can achieve things.

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  31. I think if a character is described as "normal" looking they become beautiful through their actions and their personalities. In the terms of physically beauty, it really doesn't matter what they look like, I end up forgetting what they look like anyway because it's overshadowed by what they do.

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  32. I like it if the hero and heroine are beautiful but if they they don't think so themselves.By making the characters beautiful,the story shows a perfect world which I enjoy more.I know it doesn't happen in the real world but for me that is what makes it more enjoyable.

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  33. I think beauty is not physical most of the times in books, it is through their actions, their quirks, their growth throughout the story that they become beautiful. Perfect, extremely beautiful characters seems one-dimensional most of the times.

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  34. I have no issue with the characters being beautiful. I always make the characters beautiful in my head anyway, because when I read I AM the character and who doesn't want to be pretty? I know I do.

    And, anyway, if the character is described as beautiful but is ugly inside, I won't like him/she anyways, and I won't like them even if they were ugly.
    And if they are beautiful as a character; by what they do and what they say and feel, they become beautiful regardless of which outward appearance they're described with, and look beautiful in my mind's eye.
    I don't mind the characters being more 'human' and less perfectly beautiful, though.
    And, really, I'm kind of sick of the heroines who are stunningly beautiful and are certain they are not even when guys throw themselves at them.
    However, I do love reading of a heroine who doesn't believe she's beautiful because of an emotional scar, and learns to love herself and think of herself as pretty throughout the story.

    So... yeah, in general I don't mind them being called beautiful.

    I sort of said a lot here. Hope you understood anything xD

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  35. Interestingly enough, though Stacee didn't ask this question on here post of the event, I kind of went on a diatribe about it in a comment there last night! First of all, I'm glad it was brought up at all, and I loved what they had to say (especially Leigh). I noted that it was my absolute favorite part of the event that she recapped for us! I loved that Leigh said Alina doesn't become a gorgeous, sexy girly-girl -- rather, what she becomes is her best self. I. Love. That. I also laughed out loud about Leigh's comment that in YA books it's like, "There are zombies, but they're hot. Vampires? Especially hot." hee hee!! AND I loved what Leigh said about having worked in makeup in Hollywood and learning what it means to "be" beautiful, what it means to lose that beauty, and what people will do to get it back. And my *favorite* was her mocking (at least that's how I read it) of the "oblivious-pretty" YA heroine who's tall and skinny and gorgeous but, gosh darn, just doesn't know it until some hot man-boy comes along and convinces her otherwise!!! That is a HUGE pet peeve of mine (and does happen in adult books too). I hate that whole story line. And I love that they brought all of this up!

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  36. I guess it depends. I like someone who may not feel beautiful but actually is. Since almost all women struggle with lack of confidence and a warped self-image, it's nice to have a heroine who is struggling with the same thing. Plus, sometimes beauty is on the inside, not just the outside.

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  37. To me nobody is ugly, thought, the only thing(to me) is the person is ugly or not, if they don't have knowledge of the important things of life. Because "beauty is temporary, meanwhile knowledge is forever".

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  38. I mean, it's a strange thing. While realistically one cannot say everyone is beautiful, it doesn't seem fitting to call a character ugly or that they look bad. I feel like it would sound condescending. But then again, we can't keep reading about people who are pretty because it desensitize us to expect every character in YA to be gorgeous.

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  39. It depends on your point-of-view while you're reading it. To be honest, and to embarrass myself a little, whenever I read a book the heroin is always me so I can't really say whether they're beautiful or not. I'm them and they're me.

    But I think that the authors write them as attractive and beautiful so they will be appealing to everyone but I think that the beauty the author writes, is more a beauty deep within the character, what they think of themselves, than actual physical beauty.

    Of course that when there's a movie, they choose a beautiful/cute/attractive actress so they will attract audience. It all depends on what the author is trying to tell us - we are all beautiful no matter what ^_^

    PS: thank you for the amazing giveaway ;-)

    XX Ner

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    Replies
    1. I'm having troubles with the form :( I had entered on some of the first entries but when I refreshed the page due to my previous comment, it returned to the initial entry as if I hadn't enter. Plus, is not letting me sign out and then sign in with another mail. It keeps singing in without my entries.
      I think I was only missing two or three entries (I had still to click confirmed on the comment entry and had to do the last two :S)

      I know this will be unfair to others but I've re-entered my entries :( So, if you could or erase (if that's even possible) or check what is wrong, I would appreciate.

      So sorry for the inconvenience :(

      XX Ner

      Delete
  40. Beauty and YA while come up a lot so i'd say facial perfection is temporary, you are beautiful today but you don't remain like that always even with the products you use so for me the inner beauty matters much more than outwards and i totally don't have a problem with the term Beauty and YA together because as far and as many books i have read the characters maybe easy on the eyes but they have a beautiful heart too and thats what matters to me

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  41. Beauty was always something that society was attracted to. In multiple aspects - movies, fashion, lifestyle. Maybe books are somewhat included to that need of existing beauty.

    Including the fact that we are talking about YA, which means young girls that have a pretty strong conception (wrong or not) of what is beauty and what that means nowadays. Maybe authors believe that in order to make the story credible or likeable they have to meet the young girls’ assumptions. Or their own. It's really a good question.

    But it’s good when we have a heroine that "is normal", regular face, regular hair with a great personality. More like a real person, less like a Barbie. But I tend to not stay true to the author's characterization, not entirely, so.

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  42. I noticed that too but it's not their beauty that makes them unique.

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  43. I don't think its too much of a problem. I mean not all books have an attractive main character, like in Rae Carson series, she isn't a skinny stick of a girl. But what matters is their attitude, their confidence, their fight and how they overcome their emotional turmoil that makes the readers connect with the characters. Usually every reader imagines the characters in their heads slightly different anyways, so it is the personality that matters.

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  44. To me it seems that heroes/heroines in YA are always either stunning, or really plain. It would be nice to have a protagonist who doesn't feel the need to point out his/her appearance!

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  45. Unless the writer does it in a way that makes their heroine or hero annoying or ridiculous I don't mind. Also not every hero or heroine is described as beautiful. Some are beasts and others are plain ugly.

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  46. For me, their looks doesn't have an effect in being a hero/heroine. It inn his/her actions that makes him/her a hero/heroine. Thanks for the awesome giveaway! :D

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  47. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  48. I'm fine with main characters being beautiful...as long as it's not going to the point where the only defining thing about said character is their beauty and it doesn't go ridiculously overboard.....Thanks for the giveaway!

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  49. I think beautiful is defined by there character and not really there looks.

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  50. I think beauty is a subjective topic. I would like to think that the protagonists become beautiful to the reader not just because the author describes them as such but because of the character's personality and the way the readers' perceive them.

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  51. Hello again. I left you the twitter saying I had problems with the Rafflecoper (I feel such a annoying person eheh xD) but I wanted to let you know two things:
    1st, so far I haven't had anymore troubles with the Rafflecoper (just entered today's tweet link and it worked well);
    2nd, I've nominated your blog for the Super Sweet Blogging Award. Hope you don't mind ^_^

    Good luck to everyone who's entering the giveaway :)

    XX Ner

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  52. I don't mind them being called beautiful, but if the author can describe them with their quirky looks and get through to the reader that odd can still be beautiful, and that beauty is subjective- all the better for the reader.

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  53. It seems like almost every book I read, the character is portrayed as "beautiful." I don't really mind, but the idea is consistent and sometimes gets a little annoying. Plus, it makes it harder to relate with the heroine, since they seem so perfect most of the time.

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  54. While I don't want us to get in the habit of calling anyone, even book characters, ugly, it would be nice to get some more realistic heroines. Please note, I'm saying REALISTIC, not NOT BEAUTIFUL. Real girls are lovely too, even with cellulite. I've been increasingly dissatisfied with love interests lately too because all these guys are always chiseled and ripped. This is a change that must go both ways. It's just as unfair to real guys to have to live up to that perfection we have come to expect.

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  55. I don't think its an issue.. it really depends on the personality..

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  56. Oh that annoys me a lot. Especially when the heroine talks about it nonstop. You know, when they talk about the guy's perfect this and that in every other page... please stop. >__>
    (Carla C. on the raffle; jen7waters on bloglovin and GFC!)

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  57. I've noticed these days that a number of YA books either decribe a character as ordinary and forgettable or breath-takingly beautiful. I don't think it affects how I feel for that character. I base more on what this character has done and his/her personality.

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  58. I don't Know why but I always imagine the heroines and hero as beautiful. If they are normal looking or ugly, I still see them as beautiful. Also someone with a Great Personality, that makes them Beautiful. If a character is mean or a villian that is ugly to me.

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  59. I don't really have a problem with it but, I think making the heroines and heroes beautiful makes them more likable which may be due to the media but I usually like a character based on their actions and personality.

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  60. I feel like heroines, despite having obvious flaws that they themselves know they have, always tend to be naturally beautiful. It's often a beauty that they don't even realize they have until their love interest comes along and tells them. However, in books like Divergent, Veronica Roth kind of defies that perception which is something I really appreciate about that book.

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  61. i always want the heros and heroines to be beautiful and that always happens but sometimes that feels unrealistic :(

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  62. It depends, because a lot of people have a different views on what beauty truly is. I mean a person can be beautiful depending on personality, because nice/beautiful personality makes you like a person a lot more, and than even if others don't see them being beautiful, you do. It can also depend on culture, how people view different cultures. For example you might be Asian, looking at other Asian person you can say that "I view her as a beautiful woman" but someone else, like an Italian person might look at her and say "She is not as beautiful as everybody says". But I personally don't have any issues with authors having their characters described as being beautiful. It is their book and their image on how they want their character to look. But we, the readers, we use out imagination and imagine the way that the character looks in our head. Every person will imagine that character differently. Some persons "imagine" character will not always look beautiful to some other person. I think it all depends on how we view beautiful, and how each individual views beauty. I myself, always see heroines/hero as beautiful as long as I like their personality and the causes they're fighting for.

    P.S.: Sorry for writing so much, I just got lost in my thoughts....

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  63. As they say, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. :)Personally, I've read books where characters were described as ugly/not attractive enough, but had some other qualities (like fun, smart, witty..) that actually changed my perception on them. Also, although most of the heroines and heroes are described as beautiful, they always have some flaws that makes them less perfect in my eyes, hence less beautiful/perfect.
    Thanks for a giveaway! :)

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  64. Everybody's beutifull in their own ways

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  65. I believe that writing a beautiful hero/heroine can be an escape for both the writers and the readers. They can rid of the flaws they might possess in real life by becoming the hero/heroine as the write/read the book. However, this ongoing trend of beautiful protagonist might be causing negative effects on the readers. It might plant the idea that to be a main character in their real life, they must be attractive. This is why heroines like Alina is a good inspiration, because it shows that outward appearance is not the most important thing. That it is what is inside you that really matters.

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  66. Aren't they though? But then their personality will sometimes destroy them...or make them. Even the less than perfect-looking person will have the best soul...I like those stories.

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  67. I don't mind it much. I think it just reflects our society's focus on beauty. However, something different or a fresh perspective in a book is always a good thing.

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  68. I honestly don't take much notice of a character's looks, unless I really like that character or if it was mentioned repeatedly throughout the book, so I don't really care if a character is pretty or ugly or simply average. But when people of the opposite gender start crushing on that character, that's when it gets annoying.

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